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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Field study of moisture movement and ground heave during freeze-up found in the catalog.

Field study of moisture movement and ground heave during freeze-up

R. N. Yong

Field study of moisture movement and ground heave during freeze-up

by R. N. Yong

  • 45 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by McGill University in Montreal .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soil freezing.,
  • Soil mechanics.,
  • Frost heaving.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: leaf 46.

    Statementby R.N. Yong and P.V. Janiga.
    SeriesSoil mechanics series (Montréal, Québec) -- no. 30
    ContributionsJaniga, Paul V.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTA713 .Y65 1971
    The Physical Object
    Pagination46 leaves. ;
    Number of Pages46
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19476571M

    People who live in areas with a cold winter season know that frozen ground can damage roads. For example, water turning to ice under roads sometime creates frost heave. The expanding ice pushes up the road and creates a hump. When water freezes and then melts, it helps create potholes and sunken sections in a roadway. The ground conditions over the depth of the wall consisted of glacial deposits of sand and gravel. Extensive instrumentation was installed to measure the earth and water pressures, the strains and deformation of the sheet piles, the anchor loads and strains in the fixed anchor length and the pattern of surface and subsurface movements.

    Table 1. Soil moisture, tension and NO3-N data after soil-water extraction 41 Part II Table 1. Effect of surface freezing on temperature, moisture content and NO3-N distribution in the closed soil columns with soil initially at percent moisture 70 Table 2. Changes in moisture. ter supplied to the soil during the spring melt event in addi-tion to the cumulative amount of meltwater supplied during over-winter melt events, is sufficient to saturate the ∼m thick soil zone between the water table position at the time of freeze-up and the frost table position at the end of winter.

    Volume expansion of water during freezing, leading to soil heave and thaw settlement. Read More: Ground Improvement Techniques for Stabilization of Soil for Various Purposes. Vibro-Stabilization Method of Ground Improvement. Ground Improvement Techniques for Stabilization of Subgrade Soils. Share This Article. and water content, can overcome limitations encountered in field studies, such as temperature fluctuations, uncertainty of the bulk density and water content measurement, or incomplete freezing of the soil. The purpose of this study was (1) to develop a laboratory method to measure the freezing characteristic of a porous medium, (2) to infer.


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Field study of moisture movement and ground heave during freeze-up by R. N. Yong Download PDF EPUB FB2

Field study of moisture movement and ground heave during freeze-up Public Deposited. Analytics × Add. During a phase change from liquid to solid, water increases in volume by approximately 9%, which translates to soil heave at the ground surface (Lackner et al.

Heave due to volume expansion may damage nearby structures (tunnels, surface structures) during freezing and thawing, therefore understanding the soil properties and how they.

However, some field observations have shown soil water movement from deeper, unfrozen soil layers to the frozen layer with the penetration of the freezing front (Stähli et al., ;Iwata and. The moisture movement in unsaturated soils model was based oil Mitchell's diffusion equation for soil suction and the Volume changes (shrink/heave) calculation was based on Wray's model.

An important underlying theme of the book is the ability to predict ground heave and structural movement caused by expansive soil. The field study was performed to study the rate of heave. It is a gradient in the liquid water pressure that leads to upward water percolation and subsequent ice-lens formation during frost heave.

Figure 3 shows the amount of heave and the frost depth as a function of time for a silty clay exposed to a constant ground surface temperature of −10 °C. However, heave can be better evaluated in terms of soil suction because soil suction is a fundamental factor in controlling mechanical properties of partially saturated soils.

Unlike the change in moisture content which is an environmental factor, the soil suction is related to both the intrinsic and extrinsic properties of an expansive soil. In order to understand water movement through trees, a tree’s water requirements, the moisture in soil in which the tree grows, and the physiology of the tree (Salisbury and Ross, ) need to be studied.

Prevailing weather patterns and potential irrigation in the area where the tree is growing play a key role in moisture availability. Freeze–thaw action is a complex moisture–heat-mechanics interaction process, which has caused prevailing and severe damages to canals in seasonally frozen regions.

Up to now, the detailed frost damage mechanism has not been well disclosed. To explore the freeze–thaw damage mechanism of the canal in cold regions, a numerical moisture–heat-mechanics model is established. Vertical movement in foundations, in the most general cases, is caused by downwards movement of the wall or wall footings such as when a wall footing sinks in soft soil, or by an up and down movement of the wall or wall footings such as when a wall is disturbed by frost in a freezing climate or by expansive clay soils which expand or shrink as.

The study investigates the ability of the GPAF system to resist the forces induced by soil movement due to moisture variation, and the impact of this resistance on the straining actions affecting. Field Investigations of Unsaturated Soil Systems and Equipment Field Studies of Water Movement in Unsaturated Soil.

A Detailed Field Study. View Section, Measuring Evaporation from Grassed Surfaces and Trees by Energy Balance. Equilibrium Moisture Profiles and Ground Heave in Swelling Soils. View Section. The frost heave value in the deionised water test was greater than during the sodium chloride solution test, especially in the second freeze cycle.

There is an inverse relationship between the frost heave extension rate and the freezing speed in the clay soils. The maximum frost heave rate was obtained when the freezing speed was 2 cm/day. The cover liner was similar to that of design No.

The field measured frost penetration depth is comparable to measurements of the present study. Frost heave. Several locations of frost heave appeared with corresponding disruption of the surface.

The magnitude of frost heave varied between and cm as shown in Table 1. Design No. Drywall cracks in ceilings or walls: This article describes the common causes of all types of cracks that appear in drywall or gypsum board or plasterboard walls & ceilings in building interiors. Illustrations show where cracks are most likely to appear, explain why, and suggest both repair approaches to drywall cracks and how to prevent cracking in plasterboard or gypsum board.

During the past decade, the theory for heave prediction has developed within the context of unsaturated soil behavior and has become a yaluable tool for geotechnical practice.

Evidence of cyclical movement in poured concrete foundations and slabs such as crumbling broken edges of cracked sections may suggest recurrent movement. Evidence of a history of site or building water entry or poor site drainage may suggest (in areas of freezing climates) frost heaved damage to a poured concrete floor slab.

Moisture Movement By Ben Gromicko It is important to study moisture in a course that is about inspecting insulation, because wet insulation does not work well. Also, insulation is an important part of the building envelope system, and all parts of that system must work together to keep moisture from causing damage to.

amount of frost heave. Thus, to study the influence of factors other than these thermal conditions on frost heave, it is helpful to use thermal conditions that the soil will typically experience in the field.

A capillary barrier can be constructed of a layer of coarse, porous material and placed in soil above the water. A One Dimensional Frost Heave Model Based Upon Simulation of Simultaneous Heat and Water Flux,” A Model for Coupled Heat and Moisture Transfer During Soil Freezing.

” Heokstra, P.,“ Moisture Movement in Soils Under Temperature Gradients with the Cold-side Temperature Below Freezing,” Water Resour.

Res., 2 (2), pp. Two notable exceptions are the Heinenoord full-scale trial near Rotterdam (Kaalberg et al., ) and the study carried out by Coutts & Wang (), who reported field results from instrumented piles subjected to tunnelling-induced movements as part of the North–East line project in Singapore (see also Pang et al., ).

In the Heinenoord.below ground moisture movement to include moisture movement above ground by both air and vapor diffu - in a one-year study of 60 homes without any evaporation rates during finishing, rate of bleed water evaporation, curing practices and materials, etc.

While all of these factors will have some. The extensive monitoring system installed at the St James's Park site for monitoring ground movements during JLE tunnelling are shown in Fig.

e the fact that surface monitoring points and electrolevel inclinometers were removed in or beforemeasurements of ground vertical displacements using rod extensometers are still taken periodically.